IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Mosaics in the mangroves: allopatric diversification of tree-climbing mudwhelks (Gastropoda: Potamididae: Cerithidea) in the Indo-West Pacific
Reid, D.G.; Claremont, M.; Smith, L.M.; Shamoto, M.; Glaubrecht, M.; Ozawa, T. (2013). Mosaics in the mangroves: allopatric diversification of tree-climbing mudwhelks (Gastropoda: Potamididae: Cerithidea) in the Indo-West Pacific. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 110(3): 564–580. hdl.handle.net/10.1111/bij.12151
In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 0024-4066, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Dispersal; Speciation; Indo-Australian Plate; ISEW, Indonesia, Makassar Strait; Marine
Author keywords
    Biodiversity hotspot; COI gene; Indo-Australian Archipelago

Authors  Top 
  • Reid, D.G.
  • Claremont, M.
  • Smith, L.M.
  • Shamoto, M.
  • Glaubrecht, M.
  • Ozawa, T.

Abstract
    The Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) is the richest area of biodiversity in the marine realm, yet the processes that generate and maintain this diversity are poorly understood and have hardly been studied in the mangrove biotope. Cerithidea is a genus of marine and brackish-water snails restricted to mangrove habitats in the Indo-West Pacific, and its species are believed to have a short pelagic larval life. Using molecular and morphological techniques, we demonstrate the existence of 15 species, reconstruct their phylogeny and plot their geographical ranges. Sister species show a pattern of narrowly allopatric ranges across the IAA, with overlap only between clades that show evidence of ecological differentiation. These allopatric mosaic distributions suggest that speciation may have been driven by isolation during low sea-level stands, during episodes preceding the Plio-Pleistocene glaciations. The Makassar Strait forms a biogeographical barrier hindering eastward dispersal, corresponding to part of Wallace's Line in the terrestrial realm. Areas of maximum diversity of mangrove plants and their associated molluscs do not coincide closely.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors