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Long-term impact of bottom fisheries on several by-catch species of demersal fish and benthic invertebrates in the south-eastern North Sea
Philippart, C.J.M. (1998). Long-term impact of bottom fisheries on several by-catch species of demersal fish and benthic invertebrates in the south-eastern North Sea. ICES J. Mar. Sci./J. Cons. int. Explor. Mer 55: 342–352
In: ICES Journal of Marine Science. Academic Press: London. ISSN 1054-3139, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Beam trawls (bottom); Bycatches; Impact; Long term effects; Otter trawls (bottom); ANE, North Sea [Marine Regions]
Author keywords
    otter trawl catch efficiency, beam trawl catch efficiency, by-catch species, North Sea

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  • Philippart, C.J.M., more

Abstract
    Within the last few decades, the main bottom fishery in the south-eastern North Sea has changed from otter to beam trawling with beam trawling effort increasing from 1960 onwards. During this period, the Zoological Station in Den Helder (The Netherlands) has collected and registered by-catch species caught by commercial fishermen. The annual numbers of registered specimens were used to estimate the species-specific catch efficiencies of otter and beam trawlers between 1945 and 1983. This analysis was restricted to 7 fishes (sharks, rays, skates) and 10 invertebrate species (whelks, urchins, squids, crabs) all of which have a demersal life style and were regularly delivered throughout the study period. For most species, the observed variations in annual numbers of fish and invertebrates delivered to the Zoological Station appeared to be related to the changes in type of gear and fishing effort. Results from the model suggest that otter trawlers caught relatively more fish than invertebrates, whilst beam trawlers caught proportionally more invertebrate species (i.e. velvet swimming crab, slender spindle shell) that were rarely delivered during periods of greatest otter trawling effort. On average, the catch efficiency of the beam trawl fleet appeared to be 10 times higher than that of the otter trawl fleet. Furthermore, the trends shown by the model in species delivered suggested that bottom fisheries had a considerable impact on several demersal fish and benthic invertebrates.

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