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Distribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of East Antarctica in the Dumont d'Urville Sea (139-145°E) during summer 2004
Vallet, C.; Koubbi, P.; Sultan, E.; Goffart, A.; Swadling, K.M.; Wright, S.W. (2009). Distribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of East Antarctica in the Dumont d'Urville Sea (139-145°E) during summer 2004. Antarctic Science 21(3): 197-207. dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102008001697
In: Antarctic Science. Cambridge University Press: Oxford. ISSN 0954-1020, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Euphausia crystallorophias Holt & Tattersall, 1906 [WoRMS]; Thysanoessa macrura G.O. Sars, 1883 [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    abundance; environmental factors; Euphausia crystallorophias; MertzGlacier Tongue; spatial distribution; Terre Adelie; Thysanoessa macrura

Authors  Top 
  • Vallet, C.
  • Koubbi, P.
  • Sultan, E.
  • Goffart, A., more
  • Swadling, K.M.
  • Wright, S.W.

Abstract
    The distribution of euphausiid larvae along the coast of Terre Adélie, Antarctica, was assessed using oblique tows of a double-framed bongo net at 38 stations during summer 2004. Larvae of Euphausia crystallorophias and Thysanoessa macrura were observed. For E. crystallorophias larvae, the calyptopis I stage was dominant along the coast, while the most commonly observed stage of T. macrura was the furcilia. The distribution of E. crystallorophias larvae were correlated with abiotic factors, including depth and sea surface salinity, whereas those of T. macrura larvae were correlated with biotic factors, especially chlorophyll a and nitrate. Developmental stages of both species increased in age from west to east in the survey area, with younger developmental stages (metanauplius and calyptopis I) in the western part of the region and older stages (calyptopis II and III and furcilia I to VI) in the eastern part near the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT). It is suggested that these patterns could be linked with the water circulation and wind: near the MGT gyres could concentrate all developmental stages of both species near the coast, while katabatic winds near Dumont d'Urville will promote larval advection seawards, with younger stages near the coast and older stages further offshore.

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