IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Ecological correlates of variable organ sizes and fat loads in the mostnortherly wintering shorebirds
Ruthrauff, D.R.; Dekinga, A.; Gill, R.E.; Summers, R.W.; Piersma, T. (2013). Ecological correlates of variable organ sizes and fat loads in the mostnortherly wintering shorebirds. Can. J. Zool. 91: 698-705. hdl.handle.net/10.1139/cjz-2013-0070
In: Canadian Journal of Zoology = Revue canadienne de zoologie. National Research Council: Ottawa. ISSN 0008-4301, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Calidris maritima (Brünnich, 1764) [WoRMS]; Calidris ptilocnemis (Coues, 1873) [WoRMS]
Author keywords
    energetics; lipid stores; Purple Sandpiper; Calidris maritima; Rock Sandpiper; Calidris ptilocnemis; storage strategies; temperature effects; thermogenesis

Authors  Top 
  • Ruthrauff, D.R.
  • Dekinga, A., more
  • Gill, R.E.
  • Summers, R.W.
  • Piersma, T., more

Abstract
    Shorebirds at northern latitudes during the nonbreeding season typically carry relatively large lipid stores and exhibit an up-regulation of lean tissues associated with digestion and thermogenesis. Intraspecific variation in these tissues across sites primarily reflects differences in environmental conditions. Rock (Calidris ptilocnemis (Coues, 1873)) and Purple (Calidris maritima (Brünnich, 1764)) sandpipers are closely related species having the most northerly nonbreeding distributions among shorebirds, living at latitudes up to 61°N in Cook Inlet, Alaska, and up to ~71°N in northern Norway, respectively. Cook Inlet is the coldest known site used by nonbreeding shorebirds, and the region’s mudflats annually experience extensive coverage of foraging sites by sea and shore-fast ice. Accordingly, Rock Sandpipers increase their fat stores to nearly 20% of body mass during winter. In contrast, Purple Sandpipers exploit predictably ice-free rocky intertidal foraging sites and maintain low (<6.5%) fat stores. Rock Sandpipers increase the mass of lean tissues from fall to winter, including contour feathers, stomach, and liver components. They also have greater lean pectoralis and supracoracoideus muscle and liver and kidney tissues compared with Purple Sandpipers in winter. This demonstrates a combined emphasis on digestive processes and thermogenesis, whereas Purple Sandpipers primarily augment organs associated with digestive processes. The high winter fat loads and increased lean tissues of Rock Sandpipers in Cook Inlet reflect the region’s persistent cold and abundant but sporadically unavailable food resources.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors