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Comparison of large contourite drifts in the western North Atlantic
Campbell, D.C. (2014). Comparison of large contourite drifts in the western North Atlantic, in: Van Rooij, D. et al. (Ed.) Book of Abstracts. 2nd Deep-Water Circulation Congress: The Contourite Log-book. Ghent, Belgium, 10-12 September 2014. VLIZ Special Publication, 69: pp. 41-42
In: Van Rooij, D.; Rüggeberg, A. (Ed.) (2014). Book of Abstracts. 2nd Deep-Water Circulation Congress: The Contourite Log-book. Ghent, Belgium, 10-12 September 2014. VLIZ Special Publication, 69. Ghent University, Department of Geology and Soil Science/Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende. xviii, 152 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Keywords
    Contourites; Gas hydrates; Pliocene; AN, North Atlantic [Marine Regions]; Marine
Author keywords
    Mass transport deposit

Author  Top 
  • Campbell, D.C.

Abstract
    Large contourite depositional systems (CDS) are a common morphological feature of the North American margin of the western North Atlantic Ocean. High quality seismic reflection data and drilling results allow correlation and comparison of these features over several thousands of kilometres. Greatest apparent drift growth was during the Late Miocene and Pliocene. The locations of CDS coincide with pre-existing structural features such as ancient faults and bedrock promontories. Most CDS show evidence of gas hydrate accumulation. Submarine slope failures are associated with CDS; on detached drifts, thick accumulations of mass transport deposits and stepped escarpment morphology indicate repeated instability over time. The synchronicity of maximum drift growth over such a vast region implies that ocean-wide changes in circulation, continental-scale changes in tectonics and climate, and eustacy dominate over local changes in sediment supply in controlling CDS development.

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