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Large sediment waves on the Gulf of Valencia continental margin (NW Mediterranean): internal structure and evolution
Ribó, M.; Puig, P.; Van Rooij, D.; Muñoz, A.; Urgeles, R. (2014). Large sediment waves on the Gulf of Valencia continental margin (NW Mediterranean): internal structure and evolution, in: Van Rooij, D. et al. (Ed.) Book of Abstracts. 2nd Deep-Water Circulation Congress: The Contourite Log-book. Ghent, Belgium, 10-12 September 2014. VLIZ Special Publication, 69: pp. 57-58
In: Van Rooij, D.; Rüggeberg, A. (Ed.) (2014). Book of Abstracts. 2nd Deep-Water Circulation Congress: The Contourite Log-book. Ghent, Belgium, 10-12 September 2014. VLIZ Special Publication, 69. Ghent University, Department of Geology and Soil Science/Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende. xviii, 152 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Keywords
    Eustatic changes; MED, North-western Mediterranean; Marine
Author keywords
    Sediment waves; Prograding margin

Authors  Top 
  • Ribó, M.
  • Puig, P.
  • Van Rooij, D., more
  • Muñoz, A.
  • Urgeles, R.

Abstract
    Several fields of sediment waves have been recently observed over the Gulf of Valencia (NW Mediterranean) continental margin. Based on their morphology and internal structure, two different sets of sediment waves can be distinguished. Large sediment waves with 500 to 1000m wavelengths and 2 to 50m wave height are developed on the foreset region of the prograding margin clinoform, being found from 250 to 850m water depth. Additionally, over the outer shelf region, a second group of sediment waves also develops; displaying wavelengths in between 400 m and 800m and heights of 2 to 4m. Eustatic cycles control the development of the sediment waves on the outer continental shelf, which show several erosional truncations and growing stages. However, the sediment waves over the continental slope region seem to continuously evolve through time, at least since the Early/Lower Pliocene, without being affected by sea level changes.

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