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The effect of changing sea ice on the physical vulnerability of Arctic coasts
Barnhart, K.R.; Overeem, L.; Anderson, R.S. (2014). The effect of changing sea ice on the physical vulnerability of Arctic coasts. Cryosphere 8: 1777-1799. hdl.handle.net/10.5194/tc-8-1777-2014
In: The Cryosphere. Copernicus: Göttingen. ISSN 1994-0416, more
Peer reviewed article  

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  • Barnhart, K.R.
  • Overeem, L.
  • Anderson, R.S.

Abstract
    Sea ice limits the interaction of the land and ocean water in the Arctic winter and influences this interaction in the summer by governing the fetch. In many parts of the Arctic, the open-water season is increasing in duration and summertime sea-ice extents are decreasing. Sea ice provides a first-order control on the physical vulnerability of Arctic coasts to erosion, inundation, and damage to settlements and infrastructures by ocean water. We ask how the changing sea-ice cover has influenced coastal erosion over the satellite record. First, we present a pan-Arctic analysis of satellite-based sea-ice concentration specifically along the Arctic coasts. The median length of the 2012 open-water season, in comparison to 1979, expanded by between 1.5 and 3-fold by Arctic Sea sector, which allows for open water during the stormy Arctic fall. Second, we present a case study of Drew Point, Alaska, a site on the Beaufort Sea, characterized by ice-rich permafrost and rapid coastal-erosion rates, where both the duration of the open-water season and distance to the sea-ice edge, particularly towards the northwest, have increased. At Drew Point, winds from the northwest result in increased water levels at the coast and control the process of submarine notch incision, the rate-limiting step of coastal retreat. When open-water conditions exist, the distance to the sea ice edge exerts control on the water level and wave field through its control on fetch. We find that the extreme values of water-level setup have increased consistently with increasing fetch.

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