IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Spatial and seasonal variation in microbial diversity in marine subtidal sediments in relation to sediment geochemistry and heavy metal pollution
Pede, A.; Gillan, D.; Gao, Y.; Billon, G.; Lesven, L.; Leermakers, M.; Baeyens, W.; Vyverman, W.; Sabbe, K. (2009). Spatial and seasonal variation in microbial diversity in marine subtidal sediments in relation to sediment geochemistry and heavy metal pollution, in: ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting 2009: A Cruise Through Nice Waters, 25-30 January 2009, Nice, France. pp. 203
In: (2009). ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting 2009: A Cruise Through Nice Waters, 25-30 January 2009, Nice, France. ASLO: Texas. 320 pp., more

Available in Authors 
Document type: Summary

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Pede, A., more
  • Gillan, D., more
  • Gao, Y., more
  • Billon, G.
  • Lesven, L.

Abstract
    Very little information is available on the diversity and structure of microbial communities in marine subtidal sediments, especially for micro-eukaryotes. In the framework of the Belgian MICROMET project, we investigated spatial and seasonal (February vs July) variation patterns in the molecular diversity of archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic communities in 9 subtidal stations in the Belgian Continental Plate (BCP) in relation to sediment granulometry, geochemistry and metal contamination. Microbial diversity was determined using DGGE and clone libraries based on the SSU rDNA gene; metals were determined using DET/DGT. Sediments ranged from sandy and well oxygenated to muddy, anoxic and heavily metal contaminated. Eukaryotic diversity was surprisingly high (20-50 phylotypes per station) and was dominated by Stramenopila (mainly diatoms), Metazoa and Fungi, and to a lesser degree by Protozoa (Alveolata, Cercozoa, Foraminifera). While no clear trends in eukaryotic diversity between stations or seasons were found, community composition showed pronounced differences between sandy and muddy stations; seasonal differences were less marked. Archaeal diversity was very low to non-detectable in all stations. Bacterial diversity was dominated by ?- and d-Proteobacteria and CFB bacteria; eubacterial diversity was significantly reduced in the muddy sediments.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors