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The daily food intake of 0-group plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) under natural conditions: changes with size and season
Lockwood, S.J. (1984). The daily food intake of 0-group plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) under natural conditions: changes with size and season. J. Cons. - Cons. Int. Explor. Mer 41(2): 181-193. hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icesjms/41.2.181
In: Journal du Conseil - Conseil International pour l'Exploration de la Mer. Conseil International pour l'Exploration de la Mer: Copenhague. ISSN 0020-6466, more

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Keywords
    Pleuronectes platessa Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; Marine

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  • Lockwood, S.J., more

Abstract
    Samples of 0-group plaice collected in Filey Bay, Yorkshire, during July and September-October 1969 were analysed to estimate their daily food intake by 5 mm length groups. In July there was a linear relationship between daily food intake and body weight, equivalent to 10 % whole body weight per day over the size range 18 mm to 49 mm. In the autumn when the fish examined were 40 mm to 80 mm, the relative food intake fell to 1·5 % body weight per day, but it is not certain that the relation between daily food intake and body weight was linear. The change in diet of 0-group plaice is described in relation to the size of the fish. It is concluded that diet changes to maintain an optimal prey size between 0·5 % and 10 % of the predators' weight. This change in diet keeps to a minimum the number of prey organisms required each day and, due to the falling relative feeding rate with increase in mean size, explains why larger fish in the population are more likely to have empty stomachs than small fish. Metamorphosing plaice larvae are shown to cease feeding for more than 24 to 36 hours. This may be due either to fewer attacks, or fewer successful attacks resulting from a changing eye–mouth configuration.

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