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Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life
Bottjer, D.J.; Etter, W.; Hagadorn, J.W.; Tang, C.M. (Ed.) (2002). Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. Critical Moments and Perspectives in Earth History and Paleobiology. Columbia University Press: New York. ISBN 0-231-10254-2. 403 pp.

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: General Biology BIO.89 [100796]

Keywords
    Fossils
    Marine animals
    Marine
Author keywords
    Taphonomy

Authors  Top 
  • Bottjer, D.J., editor
  • Etter, W., editor
  • Hagadorn, J.W., editor
  • Tang, C.M., editor

Content
  • Bottjer, D.J.; Etter, W.; Hagadorn, J.W.; Tang, C.M. (2002). Fossil-Lagerstätten: Jewels of the fossil record, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 1-10, more
  • Bottjer, D.J. (2002). Enigmatic Ediacara fossils: Ancestors or aliens?,, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 11-33, more
  • Hagadorn, J.W. (2002). Chengjiang: Early record of the Cambrian explosion, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 35-60, more
  • Hagadorn, J.W. (2002). The Burgess Shale: Cambrian explosion in full bloom, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 61-89, more
  • Hagadorn, J.W. (2002). Burgess Shale-type localities: The global picture, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 91-116, more
  • Tang, C.M. (2002). Orsten deposits from Sweden: Miniature Late Cambrian arthropods, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 117-130, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). Beecher's trilobite bed: Ordovician pyritization for the other half of the trilobite, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 131-141, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). Hunsrück Slate: Widespread pyritization of a Devonian fauna, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 143-165, more
  • Hagadorn, J.W. (2002). Bear Gulch: An exceptional upper Carboniferous plattenkalk, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 167-183, more
  • Schellenberg, S.A. (2002). Mazon Creek: Preservation in late Paleozoic deltaic environments, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 185-203, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). Grès à Voltzia: Preservation in early Mesozoic deltaic and marginal marine environments, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 205-220, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). Monte San Giorgio: Remarkable Triassic marine vertebrates, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 221-242, more
  • Bottjer, D.J. (2002). Berlin-Ichthyosaur: Preserving some of the earth's largest marine vertebrates, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 243-250, more
  • Tang, C.M. (2002). Osteno: Jurassic preservation to the cellular level, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 251-264, more
  • Etter, W.; Tang, C.M. (2002). Posidonia Shale: Germany's Jurassic Marine Park, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 265-291, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). La Voulte-Sur-Rhône: Exquisite cephalopod preservation, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 293-305, more
  • Tang, C.M. (2002). Oxford Clay: England's Jurassic Marine Park, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 307-325, more
  • Etter, W. (2002). Solnhofen: Plattenkalk preservation with Archaeopteryx, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 327-352, more
  • Bottjer, D.J. (2002). Smoky Hill Chalk: Spectacular Cretaceous marine fauna, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 353-364, more
  • Tang, C.M. (2002). Monte Bolca: An Eocene fishbowl, in: Bottjer, D.J. et al. (Ed.) Exceptional fossil preservation: a unique view on the evolution of marine life. pp. 365-377, more

Abstract
    Most nonscientists are usually aware of fossils, and it is commonly believed that they are extremely rare. In fact, fossils are exceptionally common in many sedimentary rocks and are used extensively in geology for age dating, interpretation of ancient environments, and the discovery of natural resources. However, there is another type of fossil deposit that is truly rare. These rare fossil deposits, called Lagerstätten, preserve the remains of the soft tissues or the articulated skeletal remains of ancient creatures in truly astonishing fine detail. Some of these deposits are world-famous, such as the Burgess Shale, or Solnhofen but there are others dating from many different geological eras from the Paleozoic, up to the Eocene. Recently, a concerted effort has been made to understand the overall significance of these rare fossil deposits. Whereas in the past these deposits were considered novelties, modern researchers are trying to understand what they can tell us about ancient life and environments. New sophisticated techniques (including image and geochemical analyses) are providing enormous new contributions to our knowledge of Lagerstätten sites and to paleobiology in general. This volume describes many of the most famous Lagerstätten locations worldwide and is complete with over 70 superb halftones showing some of these exotic fossils in all their glory. Paleontologists are beginning to understand why such deposits occur, how they have varied since the advent of marine metazoan life, and how their presence effects our understanding of the evolution of life in the Earth's oceans. In this way, the study of Lagerstätten continues to move towards the mainstream of paleobiological, biological, and geological research, and away from its former status as the examination of mere curiosities.

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