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Seismicity of the North Sea area
Ringdal, F. (1983). Seismicity of the North Sea area, in: Ritsema, A.R. et al. (Ed.) Seismicity and seismic risk in the offshore North Sea area: Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop, held at Utrecht, The Netherlands, June 1–4, 1982. NATO ASI Series C: Mathematical and physical sciences, 99: pp. 53-75. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-94-009-7046-5_7
In: Ritsema, A.R.; Gürpinar, A. (Ed.) (1983). Seismicity and seismic risk in the offshore North Sea area: Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop, held at Utrecht, The Netherlands, June 1–4, 1982. NATO ASI Series C: Mathematical and physical sciences, 99. D. Reidel Publishing: Dordrecht. ISBN 90-277-1529-7. xxiv, 420 pp., more
In: NATO ASI Series C: Mathematical and Physical Sciences. D. Reidel: Dordrecht; Boston; Lancaster. ISSN 0258-2023, more

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    Marine

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  • Ringdal, F.

Abstract
    The North Sea area is well removed from major tectonic plate boundaries, and in consequence the seismicity of the region is modest in comparison to many other areas of the world. Nevertheless, a few significant earthquakes (M ~ 6.0) are known to have occurred in the North Sea and adjacent areas within the past 100 years, the largest of these being the 1904 Oslofjord earthquake, the 1927 earthquake off the west coast of Norway and the 1931 Doggerbank earthquake. A major problem in assessing North Sea seismicity is the lack of adequate instrumental coverage, and only recently can earthquakes in this region be detected at magnitude 4.0 or lower. Based on the sparse available data, there is still evidence that the North Sea seismicity level is higher than that of adjacent land areas, with most of the known earthquakes occurring off the west coast of Norway. There is at present no evidence to rule out the possibility of future occurrence of larger earthquakes (M ~ 7.0) in the North Sea area, although the probability of occurrence of such events must be rated very low.

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