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Artemia biodiversity in Asia with the focus on the phylogeography of the introduced American species Artemia franciscana Kellogg, 1906
Eimanifar, A; Van Stappen, G.; Marden, B; Wink, M (2014). Artemia biodiversity in Asia with the focus on the phylogeography of the introduced American species Artemia franciscana Kellogg, 1906. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 79: 392-403. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.06.027
In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Elsevier: Orlando, FL. ISSN 1055-7903, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 278939 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Artemia franciscana Kellog, 1906 [WoRMS]
Author keywords
    Asian Artemia; Biodiversity; mtDNA-COI; nDNA-ITS1; Phylogeography;Introduced species

Authors  Top 
  • Eimanifar, A.
  • Van Stappen, G., more
  • Marden, B
  • Wink, M.

Abstract
    Asia harbors a diverse group of sexual and asexual Artemia species, including the invasive Artemia franciscana, which is native to the Americas. The phylogeny of Asian Artemia species and the phylogeography of the introduced A. franciscana from 81 sampling localities in Eurasia, Africa and America were elucidated using mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear DNA (ITS1) sequences. According to a COI phylogeny, 6 distinctive genetic groups were recognized, with a complex phylogeographic structure among Asian Artemia. A haplotype complex which includes parthenogenetic lineages is distributed in 39 inland geographical localities in Asia, illustrating a wide distribution with a narrow genetic structure on this continent. The invasive A. franciscana was discovered in 31 geographical localities along the southern and eastern coastal regions of Asia. Three sexual species (A. sinica, A. tibetiana and A. urmiana) have a restricted distribution in certain geographical localities in Asia. In contrast to COI phylogeny reconstruction, ITS1 sequences showed inconsistency with the COI tree, indicating incomplete lineage sorting which provided the low genetic divergence in the Asian clade. Asian A. franciscana showed higher haplotype diversity as compared to the source population from the Great Salt Lake (USA), which could be attributed to multiple introductions by mass dispersal in Asia via human activities. The invasive success of A. franciscana in Asia could lead to a long-term biodiversity disturbance of the autochthonous Artemia species on the continent.

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