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Biogenic silica recycling in sea ice inferred from Si-isotopes: constraints from Arctic winter first-year sea ice
Fripiat, F.; Tison, J.-L.; André, L.; Notz, D; Delille, B. (2014). Biogenic silica recycling in sea ice inferred from Si-isotopes: constraints from Arctic winter first-year sea ice. Biogeochemistry 119(1-3): 25-33. dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-013-9911-8
In: Biogeochemistry. Springer: Dordrecht; Lancaster; Boston. ISSN 0168-2563, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 275015 [ OMA ]

Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    Sea ice; Nutrient cycles; Silicon; Biogenic silica production; Biogenicsilica; dissolution

Authors  Top 
  • Notz, D
  • Delille, B., more

Abstract
    We report silicon isotopic composition (d30Si vs. NBS28) in Arctic sea ice, based on sampling of silicic acid from both brine and seawater in a small Greenlandic bay in March 2010. Our measurements show that just before the productive period, d30Si of sea-ice brine similar to d30Si of the underlying seawater. Hence, there is no Si isotopic fractionation during sea-ice growth by physical processes such as brine convection. This finding brings credit and support to the conclusions of previous work on the impact of biogenic processes on sea ice d30Si: any d30Si change results from a combination of biogenic silica production and dissolution. We use this insight to interpret data from an earlier study of sea-ice d30Si in Antarctic pack ice that show a large accumulation of biogenic silica. Based on these data, we estimate a significant contribution of biogenic silica dissolution (D) to production (P), with a D:P ratio between 0.4 and 0.9. This finding has significant implications for the understanding and parameterization of the sea ice Si-biogeochemical cycle, i.e. previous studies assumed little or no biogenic silica dissolution in sea ice.

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