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Modeling historical changes in nutrient delivery and water quality of the Zenne River (1790s-2010): the role of land use, waterscape and urban wastewater management
Garnier, J; Brion, N.; Callens, J; Passy, P; Deligne, C.; Billen, G; Servais, P.; Billen, C. (2013). Modeling historical changes in nutrient delivery and water quality of the Zenne River (1790s-2010): the role of land use, waterscape and urban wastewater management. J. Mar. Syst. 128: 62-76. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2012.04.001
In: Journal of Marine Systems. Elsevier: Tokyo; Oxford; New York; Amsterdam. ISSN 0924-7963, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 273980 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Marine; Fresh water
Author keywords
    Urban river; Nutrient delivery; Ecological functioning; Organicpollution; Historical analysis

Authors  Top 
  • Garnier, J
  • Brion, N., more
  • Callens, J
  • Passy, P
  • Deligne, C.
  • Billen, G
  • Servais, P., more
  • Billen, C.

Abstract
    The Seneque/Riverstrahler model has been used to explore the effect of human-induced changes in drainage network morphology and land use on organic and nutrient pollutions, for the last 20 years and back to the 1890s and 1790s. With the development of human civilization, past environmental constraints differed compared to today. Research has sought to reconstruct (i) point sources (domestic and industrial), using statistics and archives from these periods, and (ii) diffuse sources via landscape and riverscape analysis based both on maps and agricultural statistics from the periods concerned. This study shows that a maximum of pollution occurred in the 1890s at the height of the industrial period, due more to the industrial load than to the domestic load. This substantial organic and nutrient pollution might have lasted up to very recently, when the Brussels Northern wastewater treatment plant began operation in 2007, significantly reducing the organic and nutrient load of the Zenne River, returning to a background pollution level assessed herein for the 1790s before industrialization expanded.

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