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Feeding biology of Calanus: a new perspective
Huntley, M. (1988). Feeding biology of Calanus: a new perspective, in: Boxshall, G.A. et al. (Ed.) Biology of copepods: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Copepoda. Developments in Hydrobiology, 47: pp. 83-99. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-94-009-3103-9_8
In: Boxshall, G.A.; Schminke, H.K. (Ed.) (1988). Biology of copepods: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Copepoda. Developments in Hydrobiology, 47. Kluwer Academic Publishers: Dordrecht. ISBN 90-6193-654-3. XII, 639 pp., more
In: Dumont, H.J. (Ed.) Developments in Hydrobiology. Kluwer Academic/Springer: The Hague; London; Boston; Dordrecht. ISSN 0167-8418, more

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Keywords
    Calanus Leach, 1816 [WoRMS]; Marine

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  • Huntley, M.

Abstract
    Calanus has been, for a variety of reasons, one of the most popular subjects of copepod feeding studies, and much of what we have learned from studies of Calanus has been applied to other species of copepods. Nearly all the major factors controlling feeding rate and behavior in Calanus have been known for more than three decades. These forcing functions include light, body weight, temperature, the quantity, size and quality of food, and feeding history. The relationships between these variables are better understood than they were three decades ago, but the current knowledge of them still fails to explain extraordinary variance in observations of feeding rate.

    I suggest that the current understanding fails because our fundamental perception is incorrect. It is generally assumed that the feeding behavior we observe is the net response to instantaneous values of a suite of functions. Past values of forcing functions may be considered a factor, but subservient to those in the present. The critical change in perspective suggested here requires that we assume the integrals of forcing functions to be more significant than their present values in regulating feeding behavior.


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