IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Coastal ship traffic: a significant introduction vector for potentially harmful dinoflagellates in eastern Canada
Roy, S.; Parenteau, M.; Casas-Monroy, O.; Rochon, A. (2012). Coastal ship traffic: a significant introduction vector for potentially harmful dinoflagellates in eastern Canada. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 69(4): 627-644. dx.doi.org/10.1139/F2012-008
In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences = Journal canadien des sciences halieutiques et aquatiques. National Research Council Canada: Ottawa. ISSN 0706-652X, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Roy, S.
  • Parenteau, M.
  • Casas-Monroy, O.
  • Rochon, A.

Abstract
    We examined the risk of introduction associated with potentially toxic or otherwise harmful algae (HA) or nonindigenous species (NIS) of dinoflagellates in ballast water from 63 commercial ships visiting ports of eastern Canada in 2007–2009. Ship categories included transoceanics undergoing ballast water exchange (BWE) and coastal ships with or without BWE. Of 159 species of dinoflagellates observed in Lugol-preserved samples, 15 were potential HA (six Dinophysis spp.) and 46 were NIS (including three HA). We found at least one species of HA in 81% of all ships examined, and maximum cell concentrations reached nearly 4000 cells·L–1. Coastal nonexchanged tankers carried the greatest cell concentrations of HA. NIS dinoflagellates were found in 56% of ships, significantly more in ships with BWE. There was no evidence that ships with BWE contained significantly fewer taxa or lower concentrations of HA dinoflagellates, indicating that BWE is not efficient in controlling the introduction of these organisms. In fact, BWE promoted the transport of NIS dinoflagellates, possibly because of the wide distribution of several of these species. Coastal ship traffic is a significant introduction pathway for HA (ships with and without BWE) and NIS (ships with BWE) dinoflagellates in eastern Canada.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors