IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

How coastal upwelling influences spatial patterns of size-structured diversity of copepods off central-southern Chile (summer 2009)
Hidalgo, P.; Escribano, R.; Fuentes, M.; Jorquera, E.; Vergara, O. (2012). How coastal upwelling influences spatial patterns of size-structured diversity of copepods off central-southern Chile (summer 2009). Prog. Oceanogr. 92-95: 134-145. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pocean.2011.07.012
In: Progress in Oceanography. Pergamon: Oxford,New York,. ISSN 0079-6611, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Hidalgo, P.
  • Escribano, R.
  • Fuentes, M.
  • Jorquera, E.
  • Vergara, O.

Abstract
    This study assessed the structure of the copepod community in the upper 200 m of the coastal upwelling region off central-southern Chile in late summer 2009. Vertically stratified zooplankton samples and hydrographic variables were obtained from 42 stations over the continental shelf and oceanic areas. The survey took place during active upwelling, reflected by a cold upwelling plume extending out to 150 km offshore. A total of 62 copepod species were found. Of these, Oithona similis and Paracalanusindicus accounted for ca. 60% of the whole community. Species richness (R) and the Shannon–Wiener diversity index (H') were estimated, and the latter was additionally modified to incorporate the effect of copepod size on diversity (H's). Samples were analyzed for two depth strata (0–50, 50–200 m) and for day vs. night conditions. Significant effects of day vs. night and strata on R, H' and H's indicated that diel vertical migration between these two layers was an important source of variation in the zooplankton community. H's seemed to represent copepod diversity better than R and H' over the spatial scale. H's was also closely linked to colder upwelled water and the depth of the oxygen minimum zone following a principal component analysis. A positive relationship was even detected between depth of the oxygen minimum zone and H's when strata and day/night effects were excluded. Our findings suggested that the coastal upwelling process could be an important driver of copepod diversity in this region. Upwelling leads to changes in the depth of the oxygen minimum zone and these changes impact the community composition due to species-dependent tolerances to low oxygen water.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors