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Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns
Miloslavich, P.; Diaz, J.M.; Klein, E.; José Alvarado, J.; Diaz, C.; Gobin, J.; Escobar-Briones, E.; Cruz-Motta, J.J.; Weil, E.; Cortés, J.; Bastidas, A.C.; Robertson, R.; Zapata, F.; Martín, A.; Castillo, J.; Kazandjian, A.; Ortiz, M. (2010). Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns. PLoS One 5(8): e11916. dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011916
In: PLoS One. Public Library of Science: San Francisco. ISSN 1932-6203, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Miloslavich, P.
  • Diaz, J.M.
  • Klein, E.
  • José Alvarado, J.
  • Diaz, C.
  • Gobin, J.
  • Escobar-Briones, E.
  • Cruz-Motta, J.J.
  • Weil, E.
  • Cortés, J.
  • Bastidas, A.C.
  • Robertson, R.
  • Zapata, F.
  • Martín, A.
  • Castillo, J.
  • Kazandjian, A.
  • Ortiz, M.

Abstract
    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different taxa.

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