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Fish behaviour from fishers' knowledge: the case study of tropical tuna around drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs)
Moreno, G.; Dagorn, L.; Sancho, G.; Itano, D. (2007). Fish behaviour from fishers' knowledge: the case study of tropical tuna around drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs). Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 64(11): 1517-1528. hdl.handle.net/10.1139/f07-113
In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences = Journal canadien des sciences halieutiques et aquatiques. National Research Council Canada: Ottawa. ISSN 0706-652X, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Moreno, G.
  • Dagorn, L.
  • Sancho, G.
  • Itano, D.

Abstract
    Purse-seining for tropical tuna is one of the most technologically advanced fisheries in the world. The purpose of this study was to apply local ecological knowledge (LEK) to assist in the planning of future in situ studies of fish behaviour around drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs) by prioritizing research topics, thereby reducing the number of potential hypotheses to explore. Interviews of fishing masters of the purse-seine fleets working in the western Indian Ocean provided an alternate, independent, and previously unexplored source of behavioural information, specifically on the attraction, retention, and departure behaviours of tuna schools in relation to DFADs. Most fishing masters agreed that the maximum attraction distance of a DFAD is approximately 10 km and generally agreed to the following statements. Tuna form distinct schools under FADs, commonly segregated by species and size. The main reasons for the departure of tuna aggregations from FADs are changes in currents or FAD movements and location in relation to physical or oceanographic features. The number of actively monitored DFADs at sea in the western Indian Ocean was estimated at approximately 2100. Incorporating fishers into the planning and design stages of future research projects will facilitate collaborative and integrated approaches.

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