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Fish mouths as engineering structures for vortical cross-step filtration
Sanderson, S.L.; Roberts, E.; Lineburg, J.; Brooks, H. (2016). Fish mouths as engineering structures for vortical cross-step filtration. Nature Comm. 7(11092): 9 pp. hdl.handle.net/10.1038/ncomms11092
In: Nature Communications. Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 2041-1723, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Sanderson, S.L.
  • Roberts, E.
  • Lineburg, J.
  • Brooks, H.

Abstract
    Suspension-feeding fishes such as goldfish and whale sharks retain prey without clogging their oral filters, whereas clogging is a major expense in industrial crossflow filtration of beer, dairy foods and biotechnology products. Fishes’ abilities to retain particles that are smaller than the pore size of the gill-raker filter, including extraction of particles despite large holes in the filter, also remain unexplained. Here we show that unexplored combinations of engineering structures (backward-facing steps forming d-type ribs on the porous surface of a cone) cause fluid dynamic phenomena distinct from current biological and industrial filter operations. This vortical cross-step filtration model prevents clogging and explains the transport of tiny concentrated particles to the oesophagus using a hydrodynamic tongue. Mass transfer caused by vortices along d-type ribs in crossflow is applicable to filter-feeding duck beak lamellae and whale baleen plates, as well as the fluid mechanics of ventilation at fish gill filaments.

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