IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

An AFLP-based test of clonality in widespread, putatively asexual populations of Porphyra umbilicalis (Rhodophyta) in the Northwest Atlantic with an in silico analysis for bacterial contamination
Blouin, N.A.; Brawley, S.H. (2012). An AFLP-based test of clonality in widespread, putatively asexual populations of Porphyra umbilicalis (Rhodophyta) in the Northwest Atlantic with an in silico analysis for bacterial contamination. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 159(12): 2723-2729. http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-012-2029-z
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Blouin, N.A.
  • Brawley, S.H.

Abstract
    Asexual reproduction often predominates in populations of species experiencing range expansion. Locally selected genotypes can lead to the establishment of clonal populations that accumulate genetic diversity through time. Sexual reproduction has never been observed in extensive field and culture studies of the red alga Porphyra umbilicalis from Maine, USA, even though sexual reproduction predominates in this species in the eastern Atlantic (Europe). This suggests that Maine populations are indeed asexual and might consist of one or only a few genetic clones; we have tested this using AFLPs. Individuals were sampled at two sites in Maine (Cobscook Bay [n = 25], Schoodic Point [n = 26]) and compared to sexual individuals from England (Sidmouth [n = 17]). The AFLP analysis determined that individuals at two sites in Maine containing putative asexuals were not strictly clonal; however, two multilocus lineages were sampled more than once. Two genetic clones, one at each Maine site, were comprised of 6 individuals each; the 39 additional Maine individuals had distinctive AFLP genotypes. However, when the individuals from Maine were compared with a known sexual population from Sidmouth, England, much greater genetic diversity was found within the sexual population in England. Finally, we examine how preparation of field-collected material for AFLP investigations can affect the inclusion of non-target DNA and demonstrate an in silico approach for removing some cryptic contaminants from analysis.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors