IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Spatial distribution patterns of the gorgonians Eunicella singularis, Paramuricea clavata, and Leptogorgia sarmentosa (Cape of Creus, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea)
Gori, A.; Rossi, S.; Berganzo, E.; Pretus, J.L.; Dale, M.R.T.; Gili, J.-M. (2011). Spatial distribution patterns of the gorgonians Eunicella singularis, Paramuricea clavata, and Leptogorgia sarmentosa (Cape of Creus, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea). Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 158(1): 143-158. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-010-1548-8
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Gori, A.
  • Rossi, S.
  • Berganzo, E.
  • Pretus, J.L.
  • Dale, M.R.T.
  • Gili, J.-M.

Abstract
    Most of the current knowledge on Mediterranean gorgonians is restricted to investigations of those populations found within shallow sublittoral waters, and only limited data are available for populations located below scuba depth. To overcome this lack of information, the occurrence and abundance of the gorgonians Eunicella singularis, Paramuricea clavata, and Leptogorgia sarmentosa were investigated in northwestern Mediterranean benthic communities over a wide geographical (60 km of coastline) and bathymetrical (0–70 m deep) extent using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The greatest occurrence and abundances of E. singularis and P. clavata were concentrated in areas that are directly exposed to strong near-bottom currents. E. singularis was the most common and abundant species and displayed great plasticity and amplitude in its environmental preferences. Conversely, P. clavata showed a very patchy distribution that was associated with vertical rocky walls. Only isolated colonies of L. sarmentosa were observed in the study area. Hot spots of abundance of E. singularis and P. clavata were identified below a depth of 40 m, which demonstrates the importance of studying the distribution of benthic species over a wide geographical and bathymetrical extent.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors