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Effect of starvation on the energy budget of two Asian horseshoe crab species: Tachypleus tridentatus and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda (Chelicerata: Xiphosura)
Hu, M.; Wang, Y.; Tsang, S.T.; Cheung, S.G.; Shin, P.K.S. (2011). Effect of starvation on the energy budget of two Asian horseshoe crab species: Tachypleus tridentatus and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda (Chelicerata: Xiphosura). Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 158(7): 1591-1600. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-011-1672-0
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Hu, M.
  • Wang, Y.
  • Tsang, S.T.
  • Cheung, S.G.
  • Shin, P.K.S.

Abstract
    Energy budget is one of the most studied parameters in aquatic animals under environmental challenge. To examine how prolonged starvation would affect their energy budget, respiration rate (RR), ammonia excretion rate (ER), oxygen consumption to ammonia–nitrogen excretion (O:N) ratio and scope for growth (SfG) representing the balance between energy intake and metabolic output, two Asian horseshoe crab species, Tachypleus tridentatus and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda, were investigated in two feeding regimes (fed and starved) over a period of 7 weeks. No significant effects of species and time course, as well as their interaction, on absorption efficiency were observed in the fed treatments. For both species, RR and ER of the starved treatments significantly decreased, while their O:N ratio significantly increased during the experiment. However, such values for the fed treatments remained relatively stable over the study period. A rapid reduction in SfG was only apparent in the first week of the starved treatments for both species; thereafter, their SfG remained relatively constant. In the fed treatments, SfG of T. tridentatus was significantly lower than that of C. rotundicauda throughout the experiment. In general, C. rotundicauda showed a greater decrease in SfG under starvation than T. tridentatus, suggesting that they may have a more competitive life-history strategy for adjusting to poor nutritional conditions.

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