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Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus elemental stoichiometry in aquacultured and wild-caught fish and consequences for pelagic nutrient dynamics
Czamanski, M.; Nugtaha, A.; Pondaven, P.; Lasbleiz, M.; Masson, A.; Caroff, N.; Bellail, R.; Tréguer, P. (2011). Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus elemental stoichiometry in aquacultured and wild-caught fish and consequences for pelagic nutrient dynamics. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 158(12): 2847-2862. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-011-1783-7
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Czamanski, M.
  • Nugtaha, A.
  • Pondaven, P.
  • Lasbleiz, M.
  • Masson, A.
  • Caroff, N.
  • Bellail, R.
  • Tréguer, P., more

Abstract
    The elemental carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compositions of the whole-body and gut content of wild marine fish inhabiting the Bay of Biscay (Northeast Atlantic) were studied. Furthermore, the literature was examined for studies of aquacultured fish, reporting the elemental composition of the whole-body fish, that of their food, and nutrient assimilation and gross growth efficiencies (GGE). In both wild-caught and aquacultured fish, significant differences in C, N and P elemental composition were found between species, with P being the most variable component. Differences among species in terms of C, N and P content could be explained by varying proportions of storage compounds in whole-body fish, and varying degrees of ossification. Aquacultured fish feces were found to be P-rich, because of a lower P assimilation efficiency, compared to C or N assimilation efficiencies. Examination of aquacultured fish literature also revealed that C, N and P GGE and nutrient resupply ratios agreed with basic principles of homeostatic regulation of whole-body fish elemental composition. Extrapolation of the results to broader marine systems indicated that fish may be important for conveying nutrients toward the ocean interior.

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