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Limited connectivity and a phylogeographic break characterize populations of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, in the Indo-Malay Archipelago: inferences from a mitochondrial and microsatellite loci
Dohna, T.; Timm, J.; Hamid, L.; Kochzius, M. (2015). Limited connectivity and a phylogeographic break characterize populations of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, in the Indo-Malay Archipelago: inferences from a mitochondrial and microsatellite loci. Ecol. Evol. 5(8): 1717-1733. dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.1455
In: Ecology and Evolution. John Wiley & Sons: Chichester. ISSN 2045-7758, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine
Author keywords
    Coral Triangle; Indo-Pacific barrier; marine conservation; mito-nuclear

Authors  Top 
  • Dohna, T.
  • Timm, J.
  • Hamid, L.
  • Kochzius, M., more

Abstract
    To enhance the understanding of larval dispersal in marine organisms, species with a sedentary adult stage and a pelagic larval phase of known duration constitute ideal candidates, because inferences can be made about the role of larval dispersal in population connectivity. Members of the immensely diverse marine fauna of the Indo-Malay Archipelago are of particular importance in this respect, as biodiversity conservation is becoming a large concern in this region. In this study, the genetic population structure of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, is analyzed by applying 10 microsatellite loci as well as sequences of the mitochondrial control region to also allow for a direct comparison of marker-derived results. Both marker systems detected a strong overall genetic structure (FST = 0.096, P < 0.0001; mean Dest = 0.17; FST = 0.015, P < 0.0001) and best supported regional groupings (FCT = 0.199 P < 0.0001; FCT = 0.018, P < 0.001) that suggested a differentiation of the Java Sea population from the rest of the archipelago. Differentiation of a New Guinea group was confirmed by both markers, but disagreed over the affinity of populations from west New Guinea. Mitochondrial data suggest higher connectivity among populations with fewer signals of regional substructure than microsatellite data. Considering the homogenizing effect of only a few migrants per generation on genetic differentiation between populations, marker-specific results have important implications for conservation efforts concerning this and similar species.

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