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On Liljeborgia fissicornis (M. Sars, 1858) and three related new species from Scandinavia, with a hypothesis on the origin of the group fissicornis
d'Udekem d'Acoz, C.; Vader, W. (2009). On Liljeborgia fissicornis (M. Sars, 1858) and three related new species from Scandinavia, with a hypothesis on the origin of the group fissicornis. J. Nat. Hist. 43(33-34): 2087-2139. dx.doi.org/10.1080/00222930903094647
In: Journal of Natural History. Taylor & Francis: London. ISSN 0022-2933, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Amphipoda [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Liljeborgia; Amphipoda; Atlantic; Arctic; deep-sea

Authors  Top 
  • d'Udekem d'Acoz, C., more
  • Vader, W.

Abstract
    The large and common Scandinavian amphipod Liljeborgia fissicornis (M. Sars) is split into four species: the deep-water L. caliginis sp. nov. and L. charybdis sp. nov., and the shallow-water L. fissicornis and L. ossiani sp. nov. The poorly known species L. polosi Barnard and Karaman, recorded from the deep Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, is considered as belonging to the same group. All those northern species are completely devoid of eyes, while similar species from the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic continental shelf do have eyes. It is hypothesized that the group fissicornis, which is specific to cold waters, derives from ancestors living on the continental shelf of the Southern Ocean. These ancestors would have adapted to deep-sea environments, losing their eyes completely. Then they would have migrated northwards through the cold abyss, and reached the cold but shallow waters of the Arctic/sub-Arctic continental shelf, without redeveloping visual organs.

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