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Intervessel pit structure and histochemistry of two mangrove species as revealed by cellular UV microspectrophotometry and electron microscopy: Intraspecific variation and functional significance
Schmitz, N.; Koch, G.; Schmitt, U.; Beeckman, H.; Koedam, N. (2008). Intervessel pit structure and histochemistry of two mangrove species as revealed by cellular UV microspectrophotometry and electron microscopy: Intraspecific variation and functional significance. Microsc. Microanal. 14(5): 387-397. dx.doi.org/10.1017/S143192760808077X
In: Microscopy and Microanalysis. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. ISSN 1431-9276, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 292302 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh. [WoRMS]; Rhizophora mucronata Lamk. [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    intervessel pit; pit membrane; cellular UV microspectrophotometry(UMSP); TEM; mangrove; vesture; lignin; Rhizophora mucronata; Avicenniamarina; deposit

Authors  Top 
  • Schmitz, N., more
  • Koch, G.
  • Schmitt, U.

Abstract
    Intervessel pits play a key role in trees' water transport, lying at the base of drought-induced embolism, and in the regulation of hydraulic conductivity via hydrogels bordering pit canals. Recently, their microstructure has been the focus of numerous studies, but the considerable variation, even within species and the histochemistry of pit membranes, remains largely unexplained. In the present study, intervessel pits of the outermost wood were examined for Avicennia marina, of dry and rainy season wood separately for Rhizophora mucronata. The thickness of the pit membranes was measured on transmission electron micrographs while their topochemical nature was also analyzed via cellular UV microspectrophotometry. Pit membranes of R. mucronata were slightly thicker in dry season wood than in rainy season wood, but their spectra showed for both seasons a lignin and a yet unidentified higher wavelength absorbing component. It was suggested to be a derivative of the deposits, regularly filling pit canals. The vestures of A. marina chemically resembled pit membranes rather than cell walls.

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