IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

A tropical/subtropical biogeographic disjunction in southeastern Africa separates two Evolutionarily Significant Units of an estuarine prawn
Teske, P.R.; Winker, H.; McQuaid, C.D.; Barker, N.P. (2009). A tropical/subtropical biogeographic disjunction in southeastern Africa separates two Evolutionarily Significant Units of an estuarine prawn. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 156(6): 1265-1275. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-009-1168-3
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Teske, P.R.
  • Winker, H.
  • McQuaid, C.D.
  • Barker, N.P.

Abstract
    Recent phylogeographic research has indicated that biodiversity in the sea may be considerably greater than previously thought. However, the majority of phylogeographic studies on marine invertebrates have exclusively used a single locus (mitochondrial DNA), and it is questionable whether the phylogroups identified can be considered distinct species. We tested whether the mtDNA phylogroups of the southern African sandprawn Callianassa kraussi Stebbing (Decapoda: Thalassinidea) are also recovered using nuclear sequence data. Four mtDNA phylogroups were recovered that were each associated with one of South Africa’s four major biogeographic provinces. Three of these were poorly differentiated, but the fourth (tropical) group was highly distinct. The nuclear phylogeny recovered two major clades, one present in the tropical region and the other in the remainder of South Africa. Congruence between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA indicates that the species comprises two Evolutionarily Significant Units sensu Moritz (1994). In conjunction with physiological data from C. kraussi and morphological, ecological and physiological data from other species, this result supports the notion that at least some of the mtDNA phylogroups of coastal invertebrates whose distributions are limited by biogeographic disjunctions can indeed be considered to be cryptic species.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors