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Biannual spawning, rapid larval development and evidence of self-seeding for scleractinian corals at an isolated system of reefs
Gilmour, J.P.; Smith, L.D.; Brinkman, R. (2009). Biannual spawning, rapid larval development and evidence of self-seeding for scleractinian corals at an isolated system of reefs. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 156(6): 1297-1309. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-009-1171-8
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Gilmour, J.P.
  • Smith, L.D.
  • Brinkman, R.

Abstract
    Some of the most important demographic parameters underlying the resilience of coral communities are determined by their patterns of reproduction. In this study, a variety of methods were used to investigate the patterns of spawning, larval development and dispersal for scleractinian corals at an isolated reef system off northwestern Australia. Two distinct periods of gamete maturation and multi-specific spawning occurred each year, during Spring and Autumn, in contrast to the single season of mass spawning described on most other reefs around Australia. The subsequent rates of embryogenesis and larval development were among the fastest described for corals, with pre-competency periods of approximately 3 days. Within 3 days of spawning, slicks of spawn and current drifters had dispersed up to 5 km, and up to 10 km after 6 days, while the times taken for drifters to travel between adjacent (>240 km) reef systems were similar to or greater than the upper competency periods of most coral larvae. Thus, under these conditions, the entire reef system, and to some extent the reefs within the system, may largely be self-seeded; rates of immigration from other systems are probably insufficient to rapidly increase the recovery of communities within years of a major disturbance. These results have implications for the management of isolated reef systems, highlighting the need to minimize local stressors and maximize community resilience to the increasing scale of disturbance and habitat fragmentation.

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