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How size relates to oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and ingestion rates in cold (Enteroctopus megalocyathus) and tropical (Octopus maya) octopus species
Farías, A.; Uriarte, I.; Hernandez, J.; Pino, S.; Pascual, C.; Caamal, C.; Domingues, P.; Rosas, C. (2009). How size relates to oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and ingestion rates in cold (Enteroctopus megalocyathus) and tropical (Octopus maya) octopus species. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 156(8): 1547-1558. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-009-1191-4
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Farías, A.
  • Uriarte, I.
  • Hernandez, J.
  • Pino, S.
  • Pascual, C.
  • Caamal, C.
  • Domingues, P.
  • Rosas, C.

Abstract
    The scaling of metabolic rates with body mass is one of the best known and most studied characteristics of aquatic animals. Herein, we studied how size is related to oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and ingestion rates in tropical (Octopus maya) and cold-water (Enteroctopus megalocyathus) cephalopod species in an attempt to understand how size affects their metabolism. We also looked at how cephalopod metabolisms are modulated by temperature by constructing the relationship between metabolism and temperature for some benthic octopod species. Finally, we estimated the energy balance for O. maya and E. megalocyathus in order to validate the use of this information for aquaculture or fisheries management. In both species, oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion increased allometrically with increasing body weight (BW) expressed as Y = aBW b . For oxygen consumption, b was 0.71 and 0.69 for E. megalocyathus and O. maya, respectively, and for ammonia excretion it was 0.37 and 0.43. Both species had low O/N ratios, indicating an apparent dependence on protein energy. The mean ingestion rates for E. megalocyathus (3.1 ± 0.2% its BW day-1) and O. maya (2.9 ± 0.5% its BW day-1) indicate that voracity, which is characteristic of cephalopods, could be independent of species. The scope for growth (P = I - (H + U + R) estimated for E. megalocyathus was 28% higher than that observed in O. maya (320 vs. 249 kJ day-1 kg-1). Thus, cold-water cephalopod species could be more efficient than tropical species. The protein and respiratory metabolisms of O. maya, E. megalocyathus, and other octopod species are directly dependent on temperature. Our results offer complementary evidence that, as Clarke (2004) stated, the metabolic response (R and U) cannot be determined mechanistically by temperature, as previously proposed (Gillooly et al. 2002).

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