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Colonization of depopulated crinoids by symbionts: who comes from the bottom and who from the water column?
Mekhova, E.S.; Dgebuadze, P.Y.; Mikheev, V.N.; Britayev, T.A. (2015). Colonization of depopulated crinoids by symbionts: who comes from the bottom and who from the water column?, in: Sukhotin, A. et al. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 49th European Marine Biology Symposium September 8-12, 2014, St. Petersburg, Russia. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 95(8): pp. 1607-1612. hdl.handle.net/10.1017/S0025315415000600
In: Sukhotin, A. et al. (Ed.) (2015). Proceedings of the 49th European Marine Biology Symposium September 8-12, 2014, St. Petersburg, Russia. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 95(8). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. 1517-1721 pp., more
In: Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom. Cambridge University Press/Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom: Cambridge. ISSN 0025-3154, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 
Document type: Conference paper

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Mekhova, E.S.
  • Dgebuadze, P.Y.
  • Mikheev, V.N.
  • Britayev, T.A.

Abstract
    Previous experiments with the comatulid Himerometra robustipinna (Carpenter, 1881) demonstrated intensive host-to-host migration processes for almost all symbiotic species both within host aggregations and among hosts separated by several metres. The aim of this study was to check the ability of symbionts to complete long-distance migrations, by means of two in situ experiments which depopulated the crinoid host. Two different sets of field experiments were set up: exposure of depopulated crinoids (set 1) on stony ‘islands’ isolated from native crinoid assemblages by sandy substrate, and (set 2) in cages suspended in the water column. Hosts from set 1 were exposed for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks to assess whether substrate has an influence on the symbionts' long-distance migrations. In set 2 cages were exposed for 10–11 days, aiming to check whether symbionts were able to disperse through the water column with currents. These experiments allow the conclusion that post-settled symbionts can actively migrate among their hosts. Symbionts are able to reach their hosts by employing two different ‘transport corridors’, by drifting or swimming in water column, and by moving on the bottom. Comparison of experimental results allows the division of symbionts into two conventional groups according to the dispersal ability of their post-settled stages: (1) species able to complete long-distance migrations, (2) species unable to migrate or having limited dispersal ability. The finding of the free-living shrimp Periclimenes diversipes Kemp, 1922 in set 2 raises the question about the factors that affect such a high degree of specialization of crinoid assemblages.

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