IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Diving behaviour of Little Penguins from four colonies across their whole distribution range: bathymetry affecting diving effort and fledging success
Chiaradia, A.; Ropert-Coudert, Y.; Kato, A.; Mattern, T.; Yorke, J. (2007). Diving behaviour of Little Penguins from four colonies across their whole distribution range: bathymetry affecting diving effort and fledging success. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 151(4): 1535-1542. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-006-0593-9
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Chiaradia, A.
  • Ropert-Coudert, Y.
  • Kato, A.
  • Mattern, T.
  • Yorke, J.

Abstract
    Little Penguins, Eudyptula minor, breed in several small colonies in New Zealand and Australia. In this study, we compare the birds’ diving performances at different sites situated throughout their breeding range. Environmental conditions and breeding success vary drastically amongst colonies, but all birds feed on similar types of prey and face similar limitations on their foraging range. We examined several diving parameters and calculated the proportion of foraging zone available during breeding to examine whether oceanographic and geographic factors in the foraging zone can explain variations in diving behaviour and fledging success among the different colonies. In colonies with high fledging success, Penguin Island and Oamaru, penguins made shallow dives <50 m depth and had lower diving effort. More than 90% of the foraging zone was in waters <50 m depth in these colonies. Motuara Island also has shallow waters with 95% <50 m depth, but the fledging success was low. Phillip Island has only 42% of waters <50 m and comparatively low fledging success. Thus, penguins dived deeper and showed a higher diving effort in colonies with lower fledging success (Motuara Island and Phillip Island), indicating that they were disadvantaged compared to conspecifics from other colonies that dived shallower and with a lesser diving effort. We concluded that bathymetry is an important factor, but not the only one, which influences fledging success.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors