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Phenotypic plasticity in a mutualistic association between the sponge Haliclona caerulea and the calcareous macroalga Jania adherens induced by transplanting experiments. I: morphological responses of the sponge
Carballo, J.L.; Avila, E.; Enriquez, S.; Camacho, L. (2006). Phenotypic plasticity in a mutualistic association between the sponge Haliclona caerulea and the calcareous macroalga Jania adherens induced by transplanting experiments. I: morphological responses of the sponge. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 148: 467-478. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-005-0104-4
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Carballo, J.L.
  • Avila, E.
  • Enriquez, S.
  • Camacho, L.

Abstract
    The mutualistic association between the sponge Haliclona caerulea and the calcareous red macroalga Jania adherens is conspicuous on shallow rocky regions of Mazatlán Bay (eastern tropical Pacific, Mexico). Transplanting experiments were carried out to examine the morphological responses of the association to an environmental depth gradient. Simultaneously, we conducted caging experiments to examine the effects of predation (mainly by angelfishes) on association morphology. For this, we transplanted specimens of the association from a control area at 3 m depth to depths of 1 and 5 m, and measured the morphological responses in the association (macro- and microstructure) from the three sites before and after 103 days. The association had the capacity to adjust both macro and micromorphologically, and both external morphology and body structure changed significantly with depth. The specimens grown at 1 m developed a larger surface area of attachment, higher organic density and higher inorganic content than the control specimens at 3 m, and the organisms grown at 5 m depth. We also detected significant differences in the aquiferous system of the sponge, which developed smaller and more numerous oscula at 1 m than at 5 m depth. These differences seem to be consistent with the wave movement as one of the main regulatory factors of the morphology of the association. However, the spicules from H. caerulea were most slender in shallow water, which is not consistent with increasing robustness in the face of greater wave force. The algal skeleton supplied up to 27% of the total inorganic structure of the association; thus, algal contribution significantly reduces the energy costs of spicule production, specifically under high wave exposure, when H. caerulea requires structural reinforcement relative to organic content. The contribution of the sponge to the association (as ratio Si to CaCO3) increased significantly from 3 to 5 m (12% in the uncaged specimens and 22% in the caged specimens), showing that the mutualistic relationship decreases with depth. The production of sponge branches in caged individuals was the most notable difference from uncaged morphs, which could suggest the effect of predators like angelfishes. However, branches could also be a response to the reduction in water movement and irradiance inside the cages. Sponges are known to show morphological acclimation in response to habitat variation, but this is the first study to show it in a sponge living in association with a macroalga.

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