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Mitochondrial DNA sequence data of the Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) suggest that population numbers may be affected by climatic shifts
Matthee, C.A.; Fourie, F.; Oosthuizen, W.H.; Meyer, M.A.; Tolley, K.A. (2006). Mitochondrial DNA sequence data of the Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) suggest that population numbers may be affected by climatic shifts. Mar. Biol. (Berl.) 148(4): 899-905. hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00227-005-0121-3
In: Marine Biology. Springer: Heidelberg; Berlin. ISSN 0025-3162, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Matthee, C.A.
  • Fourie, F.
  • Oosthuizen, W.H.
  • Meyer, M.A.
  • Tolley, K.A.

Abstract
    The Cape fur seal, Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus is distributed along the southern African coastline from northern Namibia to the south-east coast of South Africa. The species has been impacted by sealing operations since the 1600s, and historical records suggest that the taxon experienced a bottleneck prior to the 20th century. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were generated for 106 individuals belonging to six breeding colonies. Haplotype diversity was found to be high (0.975±0.014) whereas levels of nucleotide diversity were much lower compared to other seal species (0.011±0.006). An analysis of molecular variance indicated that the largest percentage of haplotype diversity is distributed within colonies rather than among them. This could be attributed to either extensive gene flow among colonies, a lack of substantial female site philopatry, or incomplete lineage sorting of haplotypes. Mismatch distribution and Fu’s F S test indicated that the population has experienced a historical population expansion probably between c. 37,000–18,000 YBP and this date coincides very well with the height of the last glacial maximum when food resources were abundant in the South Atlantic. These results also suggest that the recent sealing-induced bottleneck did not have a profound influence on the haplotype diversity and a historical bottleneck prior to a demographic expansion may have been severe enough to reduce nucleotide diversity substantially.

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