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Recent advances in our knowledge of Australian anisakid nematodes
Shamsi, S. (2014). Recent advances in our knowledge of Australian anisakid nematodes. IJP 3(2): 178-187. hdl.handle.net/10.1016/j.ijppaw.2014.04.001
In: International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife. Australian Society for Parasitology. ISSN 2213-2244, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Anisakidae Railliet & Henry, 1912 [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Anisakidae; Australia; Anisakidosis; Taxonomy

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Abstract
    Anisakidosis is an emerging infection associated with a wide range of clinical syndromes in humans caused by members of the family Anisakidae. Anisakid nematodes have a cosmopolitan distribution and infect a wide range of invertebrates and vertebrates during their life cycles. Since the first report of these parasites in humans during the early 60s, anisakid nematodes have attracted considerable attention as emerging zoonotic parasites. Along with rapid development of various molecular techniques during last several decades, this has caused a significant change in the taxonomy and systematics of these parasites. However, there are still huge gaps in our knowledge on various aspects of the biology and ecology of anisakid nematodes in Australia. Although the use of advanced morphological and molecular techniques to study anisakids had a late start in Australia, great biodiversity was found and unique species were discovered. Here an updated list of members within the family and the current state of knowledge on Australian anisakids will be provided. Given that the employment of advanced techniques to study these important emerging zoonotic parasites in Australia is recent, further research is needed to understand the ecology and biology of these socio economically important parasites. After a recent human case of anisakidosis in Australia, such understanding is crucial if control and preventive strategies are to be established in this country.

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