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Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction
Kaiho, K.; Oshima, N.; Adachi, K.; Mizukami, T.; Fujibayashi, M.; Saito, R. (2016). Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction. NPG Scientific Reports 6(28427). hdl.handle.net/10.1038/srep28427
In: Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group). Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 2045-2322, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Kaiho, K.
  • Oshima, N.
  • Adachi, K.
  • Mizukami, T.
  • Fujibayashi, M.
  • Saito, R.

Abstract
    The mass extinction of life 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, marked by the extinctions of dinosaurs and shallow marine organisms, is important because it led to the macroevolution of mammals and appearance of humans. The current hypothesis for the extinction is that an asteroid impact in present-day Mexico formed condensed aerosols in the stratosphere, which caused the cessation of photosynthesis and global near-freezing conditions. Here, we show that the stratospheric aerosols did not induce darkness that resulted in milder cooling than previously thought. We propose a new hypothesis that latitude-dependent climate changes caused by massive stratospheric soot explain the known mortality and survival on land and in oceans at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The stratospheric soot was ejected from the oil-rich area by the asteroid impact and was spread globally. The soot aerosols caused sufficiently colder climates at mid–high latitudes and drought with milder cooling at low latitudes on land, in addition to causing limited cessation of photosynthesis in global oceans within a few months to two years after the impact, followed by surface-water cooling in global oceans in a few years. The rapid climate change induced terrestrial extinctions followed by marine extinctions over several years.

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