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Pathogenic marine microbes influence the effects of climate change on a commercially important tropical bivalve
Turner, L.M.; Alsterberg, C.; Turner, A.D.; Girisha, S.K.; Rai, A.; Havenhand, J.N.; Venugopal, M.N.; Karunasagar, I.; Godhe, A. (2016). Pathogenic marine microbes influence the effects of climate change on a commercially important tropical bivalve. NPG Scientific Reports 6(32413): 10 pp. hdl.handle.net/10.1038/srep32413
In: Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group). Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 2045-2322, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Turner, L.M.
  • Alsterberg, C.
  • Turner, A.D.
  • Girisha, S.K.
  • Rai, A.
  • Havenhand, J.N.
  • Venugopal, M.N.
  • Karunasagar, I.
  • Godhe, A.

Abstract
    There is growing evidence that climate change will increase the prevalence of toxic algae and harmful bacteria, which can accumulate in marine bivalves. However, we know little about any possible interactions between exposure to these microorganisms and the effects of climate change on bivalve health, or about how this may affect the bivalve toxin-pathogen load. In mesocosm experiments, mussels, Perna viridis, were subjected to simulated climate change (warming and/or hyposalinity) and exposed to harmful bacteria and/or toxin-producing dinoflagellates. We found significant interactions between climate change and these microbes on metabolic and/or immunobiological function and toxin-pathogen load in mussels. Surprisingly, however, these effects were virtually eliminated when mussels were exposed to both harmful microorganisms simultaneously. This study is the first to examine the effects of climate change on determining mussel toxin-pathogen load in an ecologically relevant, multi-trophic context. The results may have considerable implications for seafood safety.

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