IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

Immunostimulation of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) using an alignate with high mannuronic acid content administered via the live food organism Artemia
Skjermo, J.; Defoort, T.; Dehasque, M.; Espevik, T.; Olsen, Y.; Skjåk-Bræk, G.; Sorgeloos, P.; Vadstein, O. (1995). Immunostimulation of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) using an alignate with high mannuronic acid content administered via the live food organism Artemia. Fish Shellfish Immunol. 5(7): 531-534
In: Fish & Shellfish Immunology. Academic Press: London; New York. ISSN 1050-4648, more
Peer reviewed article  

Also published as
  • Skjermo, J.; Defoort, T.; Dehasque, M.; Espevik, T.; Olsen, Y.; Skjåk-Bræk, G.; Sorgeloos, P.; Vadstein, O. (1995). Immunostimulation of juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) using an alignate with high mannuronic acid content administered via the live food organism Artemia, in: IZWO Coll. Rep. 25(1995). IZWO Collected Reprints, 25: pp. chapter 45, more

Available in  Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 2616 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Artemia Leach, 1819 [WoRMS]; Scophthalmus maximus (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Skjermo, J.
  • Defoort, T., more
  • Dehasque, M., more
  • Espevik, T.
  • Olsen, Y.
  • Skjåk-Bræk, G.
  • Sorgeloos, P., more
  • Vadstein, O.

Abstract
    In the present experiments we have demonstrated increased protection against a pathogenic bacterium in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.), after feeding the juveniles the live food organism Artemia enriched with a suspension of alginate micro-spheres containing an immunostimulant. Most likely the effect was due to stimulation of the non-specific defence of the juveniles. Poor control of the microbial conditions in the intensive rearing facilities may adversely affect the health of fish larvae, and is most likely one of the main factors restricting production of marine juveniles. Methods which help to control the microflora in the system or improve the resistance of the larvae against bacterial infection may substantially improve larval viability. Newly hatched marine fish larvae have not developed a specific immune defence. Except for eventual maternally transferred immunity, as described for tilapias, the larvae therefore strongly depend on non-specific immunity against bacterial infections. Several studies have shown that the non-specific defence system of fish can be stimulated (Robertsen et al., 1991; Anderson, 1992). Alginate is reported to have a strong stimulatory effect on cytokine production by human monocytes, with the mannuronic acid as the major active component. Incubation of yolk sac larvae of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.) in water to which mannuronic acid rich alginate (FMI) was added, improved the survival rate (Vadstein et al., 1993). This suggests that FMI may stimulate the non-specific system of marine fish larvae.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors