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Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the energy metabolism of the Chinese crab (Eriocheir sinensis) and the yellow eel (Anguilla anguilla)
Sébert, P.; Pequeux, A.; Simon, B.; Barthélémy, L. (1995). Effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the energy metabolism of the Chinese crab (Eriocheir sinensis) and the yellow eel (Anguilla anguilla). Comp. Biochem. Physiol., Part A Mol. Integr. Physiol. 112(1): 131-136. dx.doi.org/10.1016/0300-9629(95)00079-M
In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A. Molecular and Integrative Physiology. Elsevier: New York. ISSN 1095-6433, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]; Eriocheir sinensis H. Milne Edwards, 1853 [WoRMS]; Fresh water
Author keywords
    CRAB; EEL; METABOLISM; PRESSURE; TEMPERATURE; ADENYLIC NUCLEOTIDES;ACCLIMATION; OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; PHYSIOLOGICAL MODEL

Authors  Top 
  • Sébert, P.
  • Pequeux, A., more
  • Simon, B.
  • Barthélémy, L.

Abstract
    Freshwater eel (Anguilla Anguilla) and crab (Eriocheir sinensis) have been exposed to increases in hydrostatic pressure (101 ATA) or water temperature (+5°C) while being kept in normoxic conditions. Their overall oxygen consumption, ṀO2, and the adenylic nucleotides content of their muscles have been measured and compared. A temperature increase results in an increase in oxygen consumption by both species studied. However, when taking into consideration the strong increase in critical oxygen partial pressure, crabs appear to be much more sensitive to hypoxia. In contrast, with the temperature influence, exposure to 101 ATA hydrostatic pressure induces quite similar general effects in both crab and fish: following a transient increase, the oxygen consumption ṀO2 progressively decreases down to −40% of its control values after 4 days' pressure application. The results establish that both species studied, Eriocheir as well as Anguilla, are quite able to acclimate to high pressure. However, if one considers that, due to their life cycle, eels might likely be preadapted to hydrostatic pressure, crabs then appear as a better model in which to investigate the biological effects of the physical parameters.

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