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The reproductive ecology of Sargassum muticum at different latitudes
Norton, T.A.; Deysher, L.E. (1989). The reproductive ecology of Sargassum muticum at different latitudes, in: Ryland, J.S. et al. (Ed.) (1989). Reproduction, Genetics and Distributions of Marine Organisms: 23rd European Marine Biology Symposium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Swansea, 5-9 September 1988. International Symposium Series, : pp. 147-152
In: Ryland, J.S.; Tyler, P.A. (Ed.) (1989). Reproduction, Genetics and Distributions of Marine Organisms: 23rd European Marine Biology Symposium, School of Biological Sciences, University of Wales, Swansea, 5-9 September 1988. International Symposium Series. Olsen & Olsen: Fredensborg. ISBN 87-85215-15-5. VIII, 469 pp., more
In: International Symposium Series. Olsen & Olsen: Fredensborg, more

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Document type: Conference paper

Keywords
    Latitudinal variations; Reproduction; Sargassum (Bactrophycus) muticum (Yendo) Fensholt, 1955 [WoRMS]; INE, USA, California, Santa Barbara [gazetteer]; Marine

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  • Norton, T.A., more
  • Deysher, L.E.

Abstract
    The fecundity of the invasive brown seaweed Sargassum muticum (Yendo) Fensholt growing at Santa Barbara,California was examined. Fertile receptacles represent approximately half the total fresh weight of theplant. Each receptacle produces approximately 300 eggs and even a plant weighing only 15 g can release inits first season well over a half million eggs.The percentage fertility of populations of Sargassum muticum was assessed throughout the year at threesites on the west coast of the United States, namely, Friday Harbor, Washington (lat. 48'33'N) Santa Barbara,California (lat. 34'25'N) and LaJolla, California (lat. 33"501N)T. here was a marked tendency for the reproductiveperiod in more southerly localities to begin much earlier in the year and to last longer.Transplantation of immature plants 2000 km from San Diego, California (lat. 33'45'N) to Bamfield inBritish Columbia (lat. 48'50'N) revealed that the observed differences in phenology resulted from the effectsof local conditions rather than physiological differences in plants found naturally at different latitudes.Variations in reproductive phenology exhibited by plants occupying different habitats in the sameregion confirm this view.The environmental factors influencing reproductive phenology in these and other sites are discussed.Undoubtedly warmer water temperatures encourage rapid development and early reproduction of Sargassum muticum.

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