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The use of manipulated baker's yeast as an algal substitute for the laboratory culture of Anostraca
Coutteau, P.; Brendonck, L.; Lavens, P.; Sorgeloos, P. (1992). The use of manipulated baker's yeast as an algal substitute for the laboratory culture of Anostraca. Hydrobiologia 234: 25-32
In: Hydrobiologia. Springer: Berlin. ISSN 0018-8158, more
Peer reviewed article

Also published as
  • Coutteau, P.; Brendonck, L.; Lavens, P.; Sorgeloos, P. (1992). The use of manipulated baker's yeast as an algal substitute for the laboratory culture of Anostraca, in: (1992). IZWO Coll. Rep. 22(1992). IZWO Collected Reprints, 22: pp. chapter 9, more

Available in Authors 
    VLIZ: Open Repository 2720 [ OMA ]

Keywords
    Anostraca [WoRMS]; Marine

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Abstract
    The production of unicellular algae is laborious and is a major constraint for the culturing of aquatic filter-feeders. Because of their small particle size and their high protein content yeasts are considered as a promising substitute for micro-algae. Furthermore, recent work has shown that baker's yeast can be converted into a digestible diet for Artemia by chemical treatment. The present study documents the use at laboratory scale of this manipulated yeast as an algal substitute for the culture of two anostracan species.
    The experiments were conducted with the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and the fairy shrimp Streptocephalus proboscideus. A similar experimental set-up was used for both species. The algal diet, consisting of Dunaliella tertiolecta for A. fransiscana and Selenastrum capricornutum for S. proboscideus, was substituted at various levels by two types of treated baker's yeast: a fresh form and a dried product which was rich in highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA).
    The chemically-treated yeast offers promising possibilities as an algal substitute for Artemia ; i.e. replacing 75% of the algae by the dried yeast resulted in similar survival and even higher growth rates in comparison with the reference algal diet; for the treated fresh yeast similar results could be achieved by up to 95% substitution. For S. proboscideus, a substitution of 75% by either of the yeast products resulted in good survival, though growth did not exceed 80% of the observed growth in the algal control. A diet consisting solely of yeast resulted in poor survival for larvae of both species. Experiments were run to investigate whether this was due to a sub-optimal feeding regime, nutritional deficiencies, or deterioration of the water quality.

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