IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Printer-friendly version

An integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of sea star epidermal secretions identifies proteins involved in defense and adhesion
Hennebert, E.; Leroy, B.; Wattiez, R.; Ladurner, P. (2015). An integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of sea star epidermal secretions identifies proteins involved in defense and adhesion. J. Proteomics 128: 83-91. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.07.002
In: Journal of Proteomics. Elsevier: Amsterdam. ISSN 1874-3919, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Asterias rubens Linnaeus, 1758 [WoRMS]; Marine
Author keywords
    Sea stars; Adhesive secretions; Mucus; Proteomes; Adhesive proteins;Transcriptomics

Authors  Top 
  • Hennebert, E., more
  • Leroy, B., more
  • Wattiez, R., more
  • Ladurner, P.

Abstract
    Sea stars rely on epidermal secretions to cope with their benthic life. Their integument produces a mucus, which represents the first barrier against invaders; and their tube feet produce adhesive secretions to pry open mussels and attach strongly but temporarily to rocks. In this study, we combined high-throughput sequencing of expressed mRNA and mass-spectrometry-based identification of proteins to establish the first proteome of mucous and adhesive secretions from the sea star Asterias rubens. We show that the two secretions differ significantly, the major adhesive proteins being only present in trace amounts in the mucus secretion. Except for 41 proteins which were present in both secretions, a total of 34 and 244 proteins were identified as specific of adhesive secretions and mucus, respectively. We discuss the role of some of these proteins in the adhesion of sea stars as well as in their protection against oxygen reactive species and microorganisms. In addition, 58% of the proteins identified in adhesive secretions did not present significant similarity to other known proteins, revealing a list of potential novel sea star adhesive proteins uncharacterized so far. The panel of proteins identified in this study offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of sea star-inspired biomimetic materials.

All data in IMIS is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors