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Marine methane paradox explained by bacterial degradation of dissolved organic matter
Repeta, D.J.; Ferrón, S.; Sosa, O.A.; Johnson, C.G.; Repeta, L.D.; Acker, M.; DeLong, E.F.; Karl, D.M. (2016). Marine methane paradox explained by bacterial degradation of dissolved organic matter. Nature Geoscience 9(12): 884-887. hdl.handle.net/10.1038/ngeo2837
In: Nature Geoscience. Nature Publishing Group: London. ISSN 1752-0894; e-ISSN 1752-0908, more
Peer reviewed article  

Available in  Authors 

Keywords
    Cycles > Chemical cycles > Geochemical cycle > Biogeochemical cycle > Nutrient cycles > Carbon cycle
    Marine chemistry
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Repeta, D.J.
  • Ferrón, S.
  • Sosa, O.A.
  • Johnson, C.G.
  • Repeta, L.D.
  • Acker, M.
  • DeLong, E.F.
  • Karl, D.M.

Abstract
    A lot of methane is emitted from oxygenated seawater, where its production should be inhibited. Seawater incubations and organic matter characterizations reveal that bacteria aerobically produce methane from phosphonates in organic matter.

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