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Enzymatic approach to fungal association with arthropod guts: a case study for the crustacean host, Nihonotrypaea harmandi, and its foregut fungus, Enteromyces callianassae
Kimura, H.; Harada, K.; Hara, K.; Tamaki, A. (2002). Enzymatic approach to fungal association with arthropod guts: a case study for the crustacean host, Nihonotrypaea harmandi, and its foregut fungus, Enteromyces callianassae. Mar. Ecol. (Berl.) 23(2): 157-183
In: Marine Ecology (Berlin). Blackwell: Berlin. ISSN 0173-9565, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Detritus; Enzymes; Fungi; Symbiosis; Tidal flats; Enteromyces callianassae Lichtwardt, 1961 [WoRMS]; Nihonotrypaea harmandi (Bouvier, 1901) [WoRMS]; INW, Japan, Kyushu, Nagasaki Prefect. [Marine Regions]; Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Kimura, H.
  • Harada, K.
  • Hara, K.
  • Tamaki, A.

Abstract
    In the callianassid shrimp Nihonotrypaea harmandi (Bouvier 1901), the trichomycete fungus Enteromyces callianassae Lichtwardt 1961 occurs exclusively on the foregut lining. The enzymes from both the shrimp and the fungus apparently hydrolyze certain nitrogen and carbon compounds in detritus. The activities of various proteases and carbohydrases contained in the foregut juice were compared between fungus-infected shrimps collected from a sandflat in Kyushu, Japan (51 % infection rate) and uninfected shrimps from a nearby sandflat. The concentration of enzymatically hydrolyzable amino acids (EHAA) in sediment liberated by the foregut juice with fungi was slightly lower than that by 0.1 mg·ml-1 proteinase-K and significantly higher than that by the foregut juice without fungi. In both foregut juices, substantial enzyme activities were recorded for proteinase(s), peptidases, amylase, cellulase and ß-1,3-glucanase, and minimal ones for maltase and cellobiase. Of the commercial substrates examined, only in the case of the mixture of 16 kinds of dipeptides was a significantly higher enzyme activity in the foregut juice with fungi observed. In the process of EHAA liberation from sediment, peptidases secreted by the fungus most probably act as a supplement to the endogenous secretion by the shrimp. This may explain the higher shrimp growth rate recorded for the population with fungi. However, the significantly higher sediment EHAA concentration of the sandflat inhabited by this population versus the population without fungi could be another crucial factor explaining the site difference in shrimp growth rate.

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