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Microscale processes in the ocean: why are they so important for ecosystem functioning?
Seuront, L. (2001). Microscale processes in the ocean: why are they so important for ecosystem functioning? La Mer 39: 1-8
In: La Mer = Umi. Société Franco-Japonaise d'Océanographie: Tokyo. ISSN 0503-1540, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keyword
    Marine

Author  Top 
  • Seuront, L.

Abstract
    Turbulence has widely been regarded as being a homogeneous process. Turbulence effects on ecosystem fluxes have been estimated from the mean values of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates. However, turbulent processes are highly intermittent. Making use of multifractal concepts, this study shows that the intermittent nature of microscale turbulence results in (i) an increase in the rate of nutrient fluxes around non-motile phytoplankton cells(6-62%), (ii) a decrease in the physical coagulation of phytoplankton cells (25-48%) and in the subsequent phytoplankton aggregate volumes (22-41 %), and (iii) a decrease of the turbulence contribution to predator-prey encounter rates (25-50%).

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