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Heart rate, respiration and total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the Arctic spider crab, Hyas araneus, following exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds via sediment and injection
Camus, L.; Jones, M.B.; Børseth, J.F.; Regoli, F.; Depledge, M.H. (2002). Heart rate, respiration and total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the Arctic spider crab, Hyas araneus, following exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds via sediment and injection. Aquat. Toxicol. 61(1-2): 1-13
In: Aquatic Toxicology. Elsevier Science: Tokyo; New York; London; Amsterdam. ISSN 0166-445X, more
Peer reviewed article  

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  • Camus, L.
  • Jones, M.B.
  • Børseth, J.F.
  • Regoli, F.
  • Depledge, M.H.

Abstract
    Increasing industrial activity in the European Arctic has raised concerns of the potential anthropogenic impact of chemicals on this polar marine ecosystem. For the past 20 years or so, biomarkers have been developed to provide early-warning signals of detrimental impacts of chemicals on the marine ecosystem, however, most biomarker methods have been established for organisms living in temperate rather than polar waters. Little is known about biomarker responses in organisms living within the temperature range of 1.88 to +5°C. In this study, established biomarkers from temperate studies were tested on the Arctic spider crab Hyas araneus to validate their use in polar ecosystems. H. araneus is common in Svalbard fjord (Norway), although it is a temperate water species occurring from northern Spain to Svalbard at depths from 10 to 1200 m. In this paper, the effects of oil were investigated at 2°C via two routes: (i) injection and (ii) contaminated sediment. After 2 weeks of exposure, heart rate, oxygen consumption and total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC) were measured in the same individuals. In both methods of contaminant exposure, heart rate showed a significant increase compared with the control (P<0.0001, n=7); mean heart rate values (±S.D.) of H. araneus were 49.06 (±13.72), 57.56 (±7.28) and 63.30 (±6.57) beats per minute in control, injected and sediment-treated groups, respectively. Respiration of H. araneus was not affected significantly by either oil treatment (P>0.05), but two individuals (n=8) showed a marked increase in oxygen uptake in the sediment-exposed group. The basal oxygen consumption of control H. araneus was lower (0.025 mg O2 g wet wt.-1 h-1) than reported for H. araneus living in temperate water. Although TOSC of H. araneus was not affected significantly by either exposure treatment (P>0.05) the mean TOSC value in the sediment-exposed group was lower than the control, indicating some saturation of the oxyradical scavenging system. Results indicate that although low temperature appears to be the main factor reducing the bioavailability of polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons, the relatively low metabolic rate of Arctic H. araneus is also implicated in decreased uptake and metabolism of oil compounds into reactive oxygen species (ROS).

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