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Non-indigenous species (NIS) of polychaetes (Annelida: Polychaeta) from the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts of the Iberian Peninsula: an annotated checklist
López, E.; Richter, A. (2017). Non-indigenous species (NIS) of polychaetes (Annelida: Polychaeta) from the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts of the Iberian Peninsula: an annotated checklist. Helgol. Mar. Res. 71(1): 19 [1-17]. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/s10152-017-0499-6
In: Helgoland Marine Research. Springer: Berlin; Heidelberg. ISSN 1438-387X; e-ISSN 1438-3888, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Polychaeta [WoRMS]
    Iberian Peninsula
Author keywords
    Non-indigenous; alien; Introduction pathway

Authors  Top 
  • López, E.
  • Richter, A.

Abstract
    This study provides an updated catalogue of non-indigenous species (NIS) of polychaetes reported from the continental coasts of the Iberian Peninsula based on the available literature. A list of 23 introduced species were regarded as established and other 11 were reported as casual, with 11 established and nine casual NIS in the Atlantic coast of the studied area and 14 established species and seven casual ones in the Mediterranean side. The most frequent way of transport was shipping (ballast water or hull fouling), which according to literature likely accounted for the introductions of 14 established species and for the presence of another casual one. To a much lesser extent aquaculture (three established and two casual species) and bait importation (one established species) were also recorded, but for a large number of species the translocation pathway was unknown. About 25% of the reported NIS originated in the Warm Western Atlantic region, followed by the Tropical Indo West-Pacific region (18%) and the Warm Eastern Atlantic (12%). In the Mediterranean coast of the Iberian Peninsula, nearly all the reported NIS originated from warm or tropical regions, but less than half of the species recorded from the Atlantic side were native of these areas. The effects of these introductions in native marine fauna are largely unknown, except for one species (Ficopomatus enigmaticus) which was reported to cause serious environmental impacts. In other cases, the displacement of native species or economic damages are suspected.

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