IMIS | Flanders Marine Institute
 

Flanders Marine Institute

Platform for marine research

IMIS

Publications | Institutes | Persons | Datasets | Projects | Maps
[ report an error in this record ]basket (0): add | show Print this page

Innovative technique of predicting shoreline change in developing countries: Case of Accra erosion and causal factors
Appeaning-Addo, K.; Lamptey, E. (2013). Innovative technique of predicting shoreline change in developing countries: Case of Accra erosion and causal factors, in: Finkl, C.W. (Ed.) Coastal hazards. Coastal Research Library, 6: pp. 367-402
In: Finkl, C.W. (Ed.) (2013). Coastal hazards. Coastal Research Library, 6. Springer: Dordrecht. ISBN 978-94-007-5234-4. xxi, 840 pp. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/978-94-007-5234-4, more
In: Coastal Research Library. Springer: Cham. ISSN 2211-0577; e-ISSN 2211-0585, more

Available in  Authors 

Keyword
    Marine

Authors  Top 
  • Appeaning-Addo, K.
  • Lamptey, E.

Abstract
    The world over, coastal zones are known to support a wide range of critical habitats, unique biodiversity, host 50% of human populations and site development projects. These make coastal zones quite complex, dynamic and fragile and therefore challenging to manage. Shoreline status assessment is an invaluable tool for coastal resource management given the escalating impacts of emerging global geophysical changes, such as rising sea levels, and rapid coastal development. In this contribution, shoreline change detection of Accra, Ghana was modeled with an innovative technique that combined dated historic maps, aerial photography, satellite imagery, conventional or global position system (GPS) ground surveys and laser altimetry data. Such a technique shows the relative response of coastal geomorphic features and geology to coastal processes. The results of the assessment revealed that the Accra shoreline has receded at an average rate of 1.13 m/year, which is attributable to several factors. This rate of change poses a looming threat to coastal lands and infrastructure in the zone. Essentially, this study demonstrate that reliable historic erosion rates can be estimated using the proposed technique for developing nations where geospatial data is scarce. These findings have important implications for formulating reliable and sustainable coastal management strategies in developing countries.

All data in the Integrated Marine Information System (IMIS) is subject to the VLIZ privacy policy Top | Authors