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The UNESCO Bilko project: developing training capability for coastal and marine remote sensing
(2002). The UNESCO Bilko project: developing training capability for coastal and marine remote sensing, in: Brown, M. et al. (Ed.) (2002). The Colour of Ocean Data: International Symposium on oceanographic data and information management, with special attention to biological data. Brussels, Belgium, 25-27 November 2002: book of abstracts. VLIZ Special Publication, 11: pp. 2
In: Brown, M. et al. (Ed.) (2002). The Colour of Ocean Data: International Symposium on oceanographic data and information management, with special attention to biological data. Brussels, Belgium, 25-27 November 2002: book of abstracts. VLIZ Special Publication, 11. Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ): Oostende. XI, 93 pp., more
In: VLIZ Special Publication. Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee (VLIZ): Oostende. ISSN 1377-0950, more

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Keywords
    Remote sensing; Marine

Abstract
    This presentation reviews the UNESCO Bilko project that commenced in 1987 and continues today. The primary aim of the project is to make remote sensing training materials accessible to those without specialist resources at their disposal, and to promote good teaching practice by tapping the diverse skills and expertise of an expert community. Considerable resources have been generated by the project including a Windows-based image processing software package. Pedagogical materials include a wealth of short self-study lessons focused on particular remote sensing techniques, oceanographic phenomena or sensors, that students can work through in their own time. Collectively, the Bilko project provides a remarkably diverse but comprehensive resource for teaching marine remote sensing. Recently, the project has adopted a thematic framework in order to deliver more focused material and to keep pace with rapidly evolving remote sensing sensors, platforms and algorithms. The project currently serves some 1800 users located in over 70 countries and has supported several international workshops and training courses with both teaching materials and expertise. Several networks have been developed that are monitored by the Bilko steering committee, including a network dedicated to Bilko lesson authors and a network for Bilko users. All material is available from the Bilko project website (http://www.bilko.org) or from the UNESCO Coastal Regions and Small Islands (CSI) Division.

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