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Tracking the distribution of non-native marine invertebrates (Mytella charruana, Perna viridis and Megabalanus coccopoma) along the south-eastern USA
Spinuzzi, S.; Schneider, K.R.; Walters, L.J.; Yuan, W.S. (2013). Tracking the distribution of non-native marine invertebrates (Mytella charruana, Perna viridis and Megabalanus coccopoma) along the south-eastern USA. Marine Biodiversity Records 6: e55. https://hdl.handle.net/10.1017/s1755267213000316
In: Marine Biodiversity Records. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge. e-ISSN 1755-2672, more
Peer reviewed article  

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Keywords
    Distribution
    Megabalanus coccopoma (Darwin, 1854) [WoRMS]; Mytella charruana (d'Orbigny, 1846) [WoRMS]; Perna viridis (Linnaeus, 1758) [WoRMS]
Author keywords
    non-native; non-indigenous; invertebrate; mussel; barnacle; coastline; estuary

Authors  Top 
  • Spinuzzi, S.
  • Schneider, K.R.
  • Walters, L.J.
  • Yuan, W.S.

Abstract
    Our study tracked three non-native, marine, sessile, invertebrate species which have recently colonized the south-eastern United States Atlantic coastlines and estuaries: Mytella charruana, the charru mussel; Perna viridis, the Asian green mussel; and Megabalanus coccopoma, the titan acorn barnacle. Along the eastern Floridian coast, Mytella charruana was discovered in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida (FL) in 2004. Perna viridis was found in Ponce de Leon Inlet, FL in 2002, after being introduced to Tampa Bay, FL in 1989. Megabalanus coccopoma was documented in St Augustine, FL and Brunswick, Georgia in 2006. From 2006 through to 2011, a biannual survey of the south-eastern Atlantic coastlines and estuaries was conducted from Jupiter, Florida to Charleston, South Carolina (894 km) to document the distribution and range expansion of M. charruana, P. viridis and M. coccopoma. Field surveys were conducted in June and December each year at 82 sites (e.g. docks, boat ramps, jetties and mangrove roots). The ranges of the three invertebrates have expanded and retracted along the Atlantic coast since the survey began. Mytella charruana had spread as far north as Savannah, Georgia in 2007, but the species was absent from northern Georgia in 2010 and 2011. Perna viridis and M. coccopoma were present in Georgia in 2007, but were absent in the 2010 and 2011 surveys. These range fluctuations may be explained by extreme cold temperatures, which occurred during the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 winters. The patterns observed with these three sessile invertebrates provide information regarding how non-native species disperse and establish in new locations.

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